Gostujoči predavanji: prof. Benoît Rihoux, University of Louvain


Benoit-Rihoux

Med 6.1. in 10.1. bo na KDIM prek Erasmus plus izmenjave za učitelje gostoval profesor Benoit Rihoux iz belgijske univerze University of Louvain.

V tem času bo imel dve predavanji. Prvo predavanje z naslovom An introduction to “Qualitative Comparative Analysis” (QCA): a growing tool for systematic cross-case comparison bo potekalo 7. januarja med 10.00 in 12.00 v predavalnici 24.

Drugo predavanje z naslovom “Why compare?” The added value of explicit comparison across cases – and tricks of the trade for a solid comparative research design pa bo potekalo prav tako 7. januarja v predavalnici 24 od 12.00-14.00.

Povzetke predavanj (v angleščini) najdete spodaj. Vljudno vabljeni!


1. An introduction to “Qualitative Comparative Analysis” (QCA): a growing tool for systematic cross-case comparison

 Most social scientists are engaged mostly in “case-oriented” research (more qualitative, usually with very few cases) or in “variable-oriented” research (using statistics, and analyzing a large number of cases: “large-N research”). QCA is an original approach and set of techniques that strives to build upon both of these traditions. It models and processes cases as ‘configurations’, i.e. complex combinations of attributes, and enables one to analyze multiple cases (smaller-n, intermediate-n, large-n as well). QCA enables one, using mathematical treatment (Boolean algorithms and set theoretic operations), to systematically reduce complexity and to identify the key combinations of conditions (causal “recipes”) leading to certain outcome values. It is therefore a powerful tool, because it enables one to obtain ‘short’ (parsimonious) explanations, while also maintaining the complexity of each individual case.

 

2. “Why compare?” The added value of explicit comparison across cases – and tricks of the trade for a solid comparative research design

There is a long tradition of single case studies in social sciences – where the researcher does not engage in explicit comparison: he/she becomes the specialist of a single case. At the other opposite of the spectrum, “quantitativist” researchers analyze large data matrixes, with thousands of observations; this is a very powerful strategy, but it loses sight of the individual cases. Somewhere in between, it is possible to engage in “explicit cross-case comparison”, i.e. selecting and empirically analyzing a certain number of cases: from 2 to… many. Such a strategy displays decisive strengths; if well-conducted, it enables one to produce empirical cross-case generalizations and, at the same time, to better understand single cases. It is however a demanding strategy, which necessitates a strong comparative research design. Case definition (“what is a case?”) as well as case selection (“how many cases? And which ones?”) are particularly crucial operations.



Nazaj na seznam vseh obvestilObjavljeno: 16. december 2019 | v kategoriji: Obvestilo